• 3.15.17   Bill Murray Is a Masterpiece Photographed by Marco Grob

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    Marco Grob has spent a career photographing dozens, if not hundreds, of the most recognizable, highest paid, most sought after celebrities in the world. Year after year a veritable checklist of Hollywood’s A-list and Washington’s elite pass in front of his camera, and it can become something of a blur. Every time he sits with someone it’s a special experience and he relates to them personally and individually. But no one is like Bill Murray. When GQ Germany asked Marco to meet up with Murray at New York’s Museum of Modern Art he knew it was going to be a unique experience. “I came up with the idea of him becoming a part of the art and the art becomes him. As if he lived literally at the place,” Marco explains. But Murray wasn’t the only variable that they had to work with. “The museum was open. It was a completely normal day, a Wednesday afternoon, with thousands of people. All the sudden Bill Murray was there and I think they had a field day that day, that’s for damn sure. They had so much fun.”  Marco and his team kept everything handheld and on the fly because they didn’t have time to shut down portions of the museum. They stayed super agile over the 3.5 hour shoot. This kind of run-and-gun shooting could be a big risk if the subject isn’t ready to play along. But Bill Murray was. “He wants to make it count,” says Marco. “He wants to make something unique and beautiful, and he played off that idea greatly and made it his own. He just took it as a jump off point and then really gave his own interpretations.” Not every celebrity is willing to try every idea, and not every celebrity will commit to something even if they do agree to it. But Murray worked with Marco to offer the best version of their collaboration he could. “When he likes an idea he takes it and brings it to another level,” Marco says. “He is just a generally very kind and nice guy and beautiful to work with.” To make a shoot like this happen it wasn’t just Murray’s collaboration that Marco needed but also the Museum’s. The MoMA worked with Marco to get every shot they could while still keeping traffic flowing and the exhibits open. It required a lot of generosity and trust from the museum. “I appreciate them, I’m very thankful for that,” Marco says. “It was real and I could not in my wildest dreams hope that Bill was picking up on it and made it such an incredible thing. It was really something really, really special for us.”
  • 3.21.17   We Are The Rhoads Make a Statement with Vince Staples

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    Fashion is an insular world. To many it feels like an inward facing conversation; a bunch of privileged designers reacting off one another, riffing off the same ideas, molding trends to their whims and projecting a narrow version of idealism on the masses. But it’s so much more than that. When Mobolaji Dawodu joined GQ as their Style Fashion Editor he brought with himself a different take on what clothes can mean, and it was that vision that came to bear on We Are The Rhoads’ latest shoot with Vince Staples. These three unlikely creative forces blended together to create something special. For The Rhoads, Staples was the perfect partner to show off the unique fashion. “Vince has this effortless, cool, chill vibe, and he’s the type where I think he trusted everyone,” says Chris. “He trusted Mobolaji, he trusted us and he just went with it. He’s the type of person where you can put him in anything and he makes it look awesome.” That point is crucial. Dawodu has gained a reputation for choosing challenging looks with unconventional pieces that have retro inspirations. The fashion was a blend of patterns, textures, and silhouettes that are seldom seen in pop fast fashion, so the Rhoads and Staples presented them in such a way that they would be digestible to a wide audience. Staples was perfect model because he can wear anything. It’s not enough to look good in a denim overall with a tuxedo shirt. The clothes had to make sense in the images. The looks were remarkable in references and volume, with aesthetics just foreign enough to scream attention for from the casual viewer. The Rhoads gave that context, and for that they needed balance. Instead of pushing Staples to a place where his energy would match the explosive clothes, they had him work with more subtlety to make the looks accessible. “Bringing his nonchalant nature just felt right because he was already giving off that vibe already so we wanted to really capture and tell the story of who he was,” explains Sarah. “It felt like it needed that kind of treatment versus being over the top in his attitude to match the clothes. We wanted to let him wear the clothes how he would naturally wear them and what he would naturally be giving us.” Vince grew up in Long Beach and uses his platform to take the popular sheen of allure off gang life - something that is a very real part of his past. High waisted khaki pants and tuxedo shirts are certainly counter to the typical Crip narrative - he’s using all his influences to forge new ground in his own way.  The Rhoads spent the day running all around LA with Staples and Dawodu, letting the shoot unfold as the clothes were pulled out of bags and constructed into outfits in real time. The Rhoads let those moments dictate how they created, drawing inspiration from the fashion and Staples himself, engaging in a sartorial conversation with the man made topography of Los Angeles. A landmark moment came when Dawodu pulled out a big duster jacket for Staples. The powder blue fabric features a trio of repeated navy stripes, offset by thin red lines. As soon as she saw the jacket Sarah knew where she wanted to photograph it. “The Eastern Columbia Building is basically one of the oldest buildings in Downtown LA,” explains Sarah. “It has those blue and teal stripes and once Mobolaji pulled out that duster and put it on Vince I knew we had to go to this place because I wanted to give a nod to what he was wearing, and pull out the colors through the environment.” It was Sarah’s favorite moment. Chris agrees: “That was my favorite too.” The resulting images are explosive in the colors and lines seen in the clothes chosen by Dawodu, framed by Sarah and Chris Rhoads’ composition, and anchored on the solid foundation of Staple’s unflappable demeanor. It’s a synthesis of three forces flawlessly in tune.  
  • 3.17.17   Around the World with David Doran

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    The world gets smaller and smaller by the day. It’s not just that you can jet to the other side of the globe in half a day, but as we connect digitally the spaces between us disappear. We live in a global community with friends in cities from every time zone, include places we’ll never visit. But when communicating is this easy sometimes it’s easy to forget to actually get out there and see the world. David Doran wanted to bring the world a little closer to all of us in his new book ‘Alphabet Cities’ that features a unique construction of 32 different pull out prints, each as if it were a travel poster for the city. “It’s a collection of prints not just the normal way of looking at the book,” explains David. “It was born from a love of travelling and seeing different cities, to exploring places, and hopefully the book will give the reader a chance to explore different places.” The idea for this format came from his editor, but making travel posters is something that David is always down for. To inspire the look of his work for the book, David references early Twentieth Century travel posters, a consistent source of inspiration for him. Usually he brings that inspiration to bear on work in different contexts, whether it’s a corporate advertisement or social media work created as an influencer. For ‘Alphabet Cities’ he got to actually make travel posters. “I find those images really inspiring,” he explains. “I always source them or mention them as a point of reference for visuals and aesthetic, and the way the images were created using really traditional printing techniques. This is the most direct reference to those posters, the most direct way of citing them as a reference.” Obviously he couldn’t print this book the way those posters were printed in the Twentieth Century, but the look and feel can be kept alive. The book is a beautiful way to travel around the world and get an impression of 32 different cities, but the world is bigger than what fits in this book, so David had to look at the entire world and figure out which cities should be included. At least one city matches each letter of the alphabet for the purposes of the book, spurring a process of elimination. He explains what the final list of cities represents: “Both my favorite cities and then also just researching and finding some of the more hidden cities and places that people don’t quite know about, but will discover through the book,” says David. Once the list of cities was finalized he only had a single poster to represent, and in some ways explain, a whole city. So he had to be discerning with the representation: “In all cities there are particular elements that sum up the total feel for the place. So for example, New York City: the water towers make a lot of people think of New York but maybe not really think about how much of New York thing that is, so I use that as my main point of reference.” Each poster offers David’s impression of the city, a distillation of its identity in unconventional ways.  ‘Alphabet Cities: Around the World in 32 Pull-Out Prints’ is currently available from retailers all over the world including Waterstones. The world gets smaller and smaller by the day. It’s not just that you can jet to the other side of the globe in half a day, but as we connect digitally the spaces between us disappear. We live in a global community with friends in cities from every time zone, include places we’ll never visit. But when communicating is this easy sometimes it’s easy to forget to actually get out there and see the world. David Doran wanted to bring the world a little closer to all of us in his new book ‘Alphabet Cities’ that features a unique construction of 32 different pull out prints, each as if it were a travel poster for the city. “It’s a collection of prints not just the normal way of looking at the book,” explains David. “It was born from a love of travelling and seeing different cities, to exploring places, and hopefully the book will give the reader a chance to explore different places.” The idea for this format came from his editor, but making travel posters is something that David is always down for.   To inspire the look of his work for the book, David references early Twentieth Century travel posters, a consistent source of inspiration for him. Usually he brings that inspiration to bear on work in different contexts, whether it’s a corporate advertisement or social media work created as an influencer. For ‘Alphabet Cities’ he got to actually make travel posters. “I find those images really inspiring,” he explains. “I always source them or mention them as a point of reference for visuals and aesthetic, and the way the images were created using really traditional printing techniques. This is the most direct reference to those posters, the most direct way of citing them as a reference.” Obviously he couldn’t print this book the way those posters were printed in the Twentieth Century, but the look and feel can be kept alive.   The book is a beautiful way to travel around the world and get an impression of 32 different cities, but the world is bigger than what fits in this book, so David had to look at the entire world and figure out which cities should be included. At least one city matches each letter of the alphabet for the purposes of the book, spurring a process of elimination. He explains what the final list of cities represents: “Both my favorite cities and then also just researching and finding some of the more hidden cities and places that people don’t quite know about, but will discover through the book,” says David.   Once the list of cities was finalized he only had a single poster to represent, and in some ways explain, a whole city. So he had to be discerning with the representation: “In all cities there are particular elements that sum up the total feel for the place. So for example, New York City: the water towers make a lot of people think of New York but maybe not really think about how much of New York thing that is, so I use that as my main point of reference.” Each poster offers David’s impression of the city, a distillation of its identity in unconventional ways.   ‘Alphabet Cities: Around the World in 32 Pull-Out Prints’ is currently available from retailers all over the world including Waterstones.  
  • 3.13.17   Dirty Bandits Turns a Decade's Long Project into a Career

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    This past winter, like every winter for the last ten years, Annica Lydenberg of Dirty Bandits released her Calendar of Silly Holidays. Every month gets its own holiday. March has Pencil Day on the 30th. May 19th is National Pizza Party Day. July 14th is Cow Appreciation Day. A collection of 12 cards come in per pack of holidays, each illustrated with digital lettering, but even though she makes each of the illustrations from scratch she’s not inventing the holidays. They’re all completely real. “Every year I have to research a lot,” she says with a laugh. Ten years in she has to find holidays that are more and more obscure – she doesn’t want to double dip. The calendar started as the very first lettering project that she ever did, but this single project has helped shape the entire trajectory of her career. She’s used it as a tool to explore artistically, and as a calling card to remind the industry that she’s out there working and of all the different skills she has. “I send this out to potential clients and, it was actually how I ended up getting involved with B&A,” she explains. It took sending a B&A agent her calendar for four years, but eventually the work followed and now she’s a part of the roster here. “It’s always a chance to practice different styles to show off something that I want to be hired for something more,” she explains. “Early on in lettering it was a great way to experiment because each holiday requires totally different illustration and I can use a different style of lettering and then one year I wanted more chalk jobs so I made the entire calendar in chalk and that worked great. People would see it on their desk every month and be like ‘Oh yeah! Annica does that!’”  After this year Annica has decided to retire the Calendar, so she’s now looking for another calling card to make her own. In the meantime she’s using her skills for a new ongoing project: political activism. “I appreciate that people can post on their Facebook wall but that I could actually post on an actual wall. And that to me was a really interesting,” she says. “I really enjoy taking what I learn from what other people are sharing that really speaks to me that grabs me, and then turning it back in a new way for a new audience.” She taken her skills to paint messages on walls, design tee-shirts, and even paint signs that found their way to the Women’s March on DC in January.  “My goal is not to criticize anyone who supports a particular politician or anything like that. My goal is to make the people that are being marginalized feel supported,” she explains. “I’m doing this project to help the people who are scared feel less alone.” 
  • 3.10.17   A President's Tribute with Joe Pugliese and People Magazine

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    When the world first learned that the 43rd President of the United States, George W Bush, was going to spend his retirement painting there was collective confusion. After nearly a decade of being a war President, picking up a brush and a palette was unconventional to say the least. But it might have been the perfect pick for this controversial figure, and a way for the country to reflect on his time in office. This month, Bush’s first book of paintings, “Portraits of Courage” hit the market and People Magazine invited Joe Pugliese to photograph the painter statesman. “It was an easy fit but I think it was surprising,” says Joe. “I didn’t realize he was doing any kind of press right now so it was a nice surprise. And also I liked that there was some heft to it, there was some reason for him being back in the spotlight. So it was right up my alley.” The book is a collection of oil paintings of military veterans paired with their stories. It’s a tribute as much as an expression. Joe opted to arrive at Bush’s home with a small crew to keep the atmosphere intimate and reduce barriers that would stand in the way of Joe capturing the most honest portrait of Bush that he could. “I’ve always heard that he’s extremely affable, he’s a real friendly character, he connects with people. I expected that he would be gracious and nice and also sort of chummy which is what I’ve heard about him and he totally was that,” Joe explains. Bush’s legacy is complex, but focusing on painting allows the conversation to shift from the choices he made as Commander in Chief to America’s veterans and the art form he’s chosen. It’s a great way to engage with the Bush the man instead of Bush the President. “The way he talked about painting was really refreshing for me, actually,” says Joe. “He makes no bones about the fact that, he’s even said that, the most valuable part of his painting is his signature. He is doing this out of sheer love for it and it’s something that I appreciate.” The shoot didn’t just surprise Joe, but also everyone who caught the first look at it. This is the third high-profileshoot that Joe has executed with People Magazine and their Director of Photography, Catriona Ni Aolain. Just recently he’s photographed Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton and now George W. Bush for this Magazine that more and more is proving themselves to be at the forefront of investigating not just the day’s most important political stories, but the human stories underneath them.
  • 3.6.17   Sam Hadley's Horrifying History Lesson with 'Get Out'

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    Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” (2017) released scarcely more than two weeks ago and it’s already proving to be a force to be reckoned with. Having already made 18 times its budget, the horror film is luring audiences of all stripes into theater seats despite tackling an unexpected issue: race. The most notable horror film to take on racism was “Night of the Living Dead” (1968), and the conversation has largely gone untouched since then until Peele’s new film. But the conversation has been restarted in a bracingly intelligent way, and Time Out New York invited Peele and star Allison Williams to discuss the implications and potential impacts of the film. Sam Hadley was brought on board to create a companion illustration for the piece that brought Peele and Williams together in a classic representation of horror tropes. Jordan Peele doesn’t appear in “Get Out,” himself so rather than presenting an image from the movie, Sam created a poster for an imagined story. “Wicked Smart” is emblazoned across the top of the image, acting as a title for the duo, while also commenting on the consideration and balancing act that went into creating a contemporary horror film that dissects the complexities of contemporary racism. Sam has Peele and Williams braced together looking out of frame with terrified looks on their face peering into the darkness. The one source of light comes from a blazing candle in Peele’s hand. At once Sam’s image recalls 1950s horror and sci-fi film posters and pulp book covers, as well as Scooby Doo and The Hardy Boys. This is a tradition that reaches far beyond even full representation of black Americans in popular culture. Sam’s image at once lampoons the exclusive nature of the form, while inviting the beginning of a new generation. This is the way we’re used to seeing horror stories from the very beginning. We can maintain that tradition if we’re willing to open it up, which is exactly what Sam is doing with this illustration and Peele is doing with his blockbuster.
  • 3.14.17   Alastair Strong Hoists Us Up With Hunger Magazine

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    Alastair Strong lives on the edge. Or at least photographs on the edge. His latest shoot with Hunger Magazine for Louis Vuitton’s current season of accessories brought him to the cliffs of Madeira to photograph the bags and belts of the collection. For Alastair it’s about more than just bumping his heart rate in adventure exploration; the aesthetic payoffs make the trek worth it. “I was totally drawn to that contrast between these highly polished goods and this completely natural environment that was so sharp and so rough,” Alastair says. “I was instantly drawn to that contrast and it’s something I think I’m coming a little bit obsessed with. It’s definitely becoming one of those things.” This textural conversation is appearing in Alastair’s work more and more, but of course photographing products on the edge of cliffs can be a little dangerous. Alastair isn’t worried about it though. He has a tip: “The general rule is: Don’t fall off.” As we said, the aesthetic contrast of natural environments with high-end luxury design is appearing more and more in Alastair’s work, but it’s something that he’s been searching out for a long time. Having developed this conversation in his work for a while, it’s much more mature in his work than some of his peers.  “It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a long time and something that I don’t see many people doing much of,” he explains. “I see people shooting still lifes outside but I don’t see too many people pushing boundaries with it.” Alastair likes to push those boundaries as much as possible, even if it takes him to the craggy peaks of Madeira’s cliffs. Still life can be tricky business. Even without a human subject, the image still needs to be compelling. There aren’t any objective relationships that Alastair can imply with models, no human emotional story. But there is something, and it’s crucial. It’s what he puts at the center of his work. “What you focus on is the form. Some pieces feel quite playful, and other pieces feel quite serious and some feel more austere,” Alastair explains. “The coiled belts feel quite playful, almost like springs on the top of a cliff. And then the straight belt is just a pure contrast to the texture of the rock. There is not a single straight line in that background and you’ve got this poker straight belt. I’m just playing around with it a little bit.” Even if the story isn’t a narrative of human experience, Alastair can still balance the aesthetic forces of each piece and play them off each other, their own form, and the surrounding environment to create images that draw the viewer in - even if the content is inanimate. He creates a relationship between the viewer and the image, pulling us into a story we never even knew we needed to be a part of.
B&A Instafeed
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#MoMA #BillMurray #Murray #art #modernart #portrait #instagood #photo #photography #fashion #photooftheday #menswear #menstyle #mensstyle #menfashion
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  • Zaer Ibrahim, age 8, photographed by the burning oil wells in Qayyara by @joeyldotcom with @oxfaminternational. Don
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  • @joeyldotcom reminds us that life happens even around the worst conflict. He recently traveled to Qayyara, Iraq with @oxfamamerica and found these children playing while their oil wells burned.⠀
#Travel #streetart #vibes #instatravel #travelgram #tourism #instago #passportready #wanderlust #ilovetravel #instapassport #postcardsfromtheworld #العراق #iraq #عێراق #oxfam #peace #سلام
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  • The mix of cultures that @platon found in his project with @nymag reaches even the youngest immigrants in New York City. These issues touch us all, even if it
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